Barkleys

The Barkleys of Broadway (1949)

Originally published September 11th, 2013 The Barkleys of Broadway, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’ last film together as well as their only one in color, probably wasn’t the one I should have started with; that or I’m not going to enjoy their earlier work.  The Barkleys of Broadway feels like a lot of “been there,…

MyReputation

My Reputation (1946)

The final film of Barbara Stanwyck week is one I had previously experienced part of. Having previously watched half of My Reputation, the latter half, I was intrigued by a human exploration of women’s roles once they enter widowhood. Much like East Side, West Side, My Reputation benefits from a female screenwriter, Catherine Turney, who…

EastSideWestSide

East Side, West Side (1949)

After the disappointing Annie Oakley, I yearned for something good. Thankfully, I found it with director Mervyn LeRoy A-list melodrama, East Side, West Side. In my review of Oakley I complained about Barbara’s agency and accomplishments being negated for love of a man. Screenwriter Isobel Lennart takes the typical “woman’s picture,” infusing it with emotion…

DoubleIndemnity

Double Indemnity (1944)

Originally published March 2012 This is my second viewing of Double Indemnity, and my first time where I actually had to study it critically as part of my Women in Film class.  The first time I saw the movie was for an earlier film class and while I enjoyed it, I didn’t consider it anything…

Anchors Aweigh

Anchors Aweigh (1945)

We conclude Gene Kelly week a bit disappointed. On the Town was a charming musical taking three separate stories, separated and combined them, presenting a solid, albeit thin tale in a well paced ninety minutes. Now imagine reducing that story to two sailors and one girl, adding in a love triangle, Jose Iturbi, Tom and…

OntheTown

On the Town (1949)

Can I just say, I’m fairly proud of myself that I got through the first two weeks of the July Five before falling behind on posting. However, Gene Kelly week is coming to a close and where are we? I deliberately started put Kelly’s 1950s titles first since, by then, he was established as a…