Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Doctor Zhivago is a movie whose reputation precedes it. Doctor Zhivago marks my first foray into David Lean territory – a director I’ve avoided because his movies require getting comfy for over two hours. With that, Zhivago lives up to the definition of the word “epic” and boasts some incredible performances, from Julie Christie in particular, that deliver…

Che! (1969)

The first person to cross the finish line wins, a rule that Hollywood endorses no matter what. When revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara died in 1967 Hollywood scrambled to present his life on film. Two years later Che! (complete with exclamation point) was created, a movie that resulted in controversy and censure. Film critic Steven Scheur…

The Canterville Ghost (1944)

Originally published August 13th, 2013 Pint-sized actress Margaret O’Brien’s movies aren’t always winners (Tenth Avenue Angel), but her exuberance and maturity, all while remaining innocent and precious, elevates the work everytime. The Canterville Ghost was a film I’ve been dying to see, especially as it was released the same year as her indelible performance as Tootie…

The Young Lions (1958)

Cinematic misfires can happen in Hollywood. Cleopatra is a great example. Take A-list stars, add an exorbitant budget and you’ll have an instant hit, right? I appreciate Cleopatra (1963), but I can agree there are big issues that some recasting and other changes could have maybe improved upon. I use this as the foundation for my…

Hail the Conquering Hero (1944)

Our final Preston Sturges film of the week with Hail the Conquering Hero, one of two Sturges films released in the same year, both starring Eddie Bracken (the other being The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek). Unlike yesterday’s Great McGinty, Hail the Conquering Hero blends Sturges’ romantic ideals of patriotism, honesty, and forthrightness with a madcap…